Jul 23, 2019  
2017-2018 Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Understanding Course Requirements

Guilford Technical Community College is committed to student success. The college offers courses for students who need additional academic preparation. GTCC requires that students are proficient in reading, writing, and math or a combination of these basic skills before they can enroll in most college courses.


The following is an alpha-numeric listing of course descriptions for all curriculum programs. A three-letter course prefix identifies the program area in which a course is offered. The three or four digit course number identifies a specific course within a program. The course title introduces the subject matter of a course. The group of numbers to the right of a course title gives, in order of information, the lecture hours per week, laboratory and/or shop hours per week, clinic and/or cooperative work hours per week, and the last digit gives the semester credit hours awarded for successful completion of the course.

 

Humanities

  
  •  

    HUM 115 Critical Thinking

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts. Using word processing/ presentation software application, this course may meet the SACS humanities requirement for AAS degree programs. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): C or better ENG 111.  
  
  •  

    HUM 120 Cultural Studies

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the distinctive features of a particular culture. Topics include art, history, music, literature, politics, philosophy, and religion. Upon completion, students should be able to appreciate the unique character of the study culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    HUM 121 The Nature of America

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of the American cultural, social, and political experience. Emphasis is placed on the multicultural character of American society, distinctive qualities of various regions, and the American political system. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant cultural, social, and political aspects of American life. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    HUM 122 Southern Culture

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course explores the major qualities that make the South a distinctive region. Topics include music, politics, literature, art, religion, race relations, and the role of social class in historical and contemporary contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the characteristics that distinguish Southern culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in ENG 111.  
  
  •  

    HUM 130 Myth in Human Culture

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an in-depth study of myths and legends. Topics include the varied sources of myths and their influence on the individual and society within diverse cultural contexts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a general familiarity with myths and a broad-based understanding of the influence of myths and legends on modern culture. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    HUM 150 American Women’s Studies

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an inter-disciplinary study of the history, literature, and social roles of American women from Colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on women’s roles as reflected in American language usage, education, law, the workplace, and mainstream culture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze the roles of women as reflected in various cultural forms. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    HUM 160 Introduction to Film

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the fundamental elements of film artistry and production. Topics include film styles, history, and production techniques, as well as the social values reflected in film art. Upon completion, students should be able to critically analyze the elements covered in relation to selected films. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    HUM 161 Advanced Film Studies

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an advanced study of film art and production, building on skills learned in HUM 160.  Topics include advanced film production techniques, film genres, examination of master directors’ styles, and the relation of film to culture. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize and critically analyze advanced elements of film production. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): HUM 160.  
  
  •  

    HUM 211 Humanities I

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the humanities as a record in literature, music, art, history, religion, and philosophy of humankind’s answers to the fundamental questions of existence. Emphasis is placed on the interconnectedness of various aspects of cultures from ancient through early modern times. Upon completion, students should be able to identify significant figures and cultural contributions of the periods studied. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in ENG 111.  
  
  •  

    HUM 212 Humanities II

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the humanities as a record in literature, music, art, history, religion, and philosophy of humankind’s answers to the fundamental questions of existence. Emphasis is placed on the interconnectedness of various aspects of cultures from early modern times to the present. Upon completion, students should be able to identify significant figures and cultural contributions of the periods studied. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Humanities/Fine Arts. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in ENG 111.  

Hydraulics

  
  •  

    HYD 110 Hydraulics/Pneumatics I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Topics include standard symbols, pumps, control valves, control assemblies, actuators, FRL, maintenance procedures, and switching and control devices. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the operation of a fluid power system, including design, application and troubleshooting.

Industrial Science

  
  •  

    ISC 112 Industrial Safety

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety and OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment and OSHA compliance.
  
  •  

    ISC 115 Construction Safety

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the basic concepts of construction site safety. Topics include ladders, lifting, lock-out/tag-out, personal protective devices, scaffolds, and above/below ground work based on OSHA regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of applicable safety regulations and safely participate in construction projects.
  
  •  

    ISC 132 Manufacturing Quality Control

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces quality concepts and techniques used in industry. Topics include elementary statistics and probability, process control, process capability, and quality improvement tools. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts and principles of quality and apply them to the work environment.

Information Systems Security

  
  •  

    SEC 110 Security Concepts

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the concepts and issues related to securing information systems and the development of policies to implement information security controls. Topics include the historical view of networking and security, security issues, trends, security resources, and the role of policy, people, and processes in information security. Upon completion, students should be able to identify information security risks, create an information security policy, and identify processes to implement and enforce policy.
  
  •  

    SEC 150 Secure Communications

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of current technologies used to provide secure transport of information across networks. Topics include data integrity through encryption, Virtual Private Networks, SSL, SSH, and IPSec. Upon completion, students should be able to implement secure data transmission technologies.
  
  •  

    SEC 160 Secure Admin I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of security administration and fundamentals of designing security architectures. Topics include networking technologies, TCP/IP concepts, protocols, network traffic analysis, monitoring, and security best practices. Upon completion, students should be able to identify normal network traffic using network analysis tools and design basic security defenses.
  
  •  

    SEC 180 Information Assurance Principles

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the concepts of layered and comprehensive Information Assurance best practices. Topics include user defensive measures, edge defensive measures, along with confidentiality, integrity and availability of enterprise data with the business continuity concepts of: redundancy, disaster recovery, incident handling, compliance and auditing. Upon completion, students should be able to plan effective information assurance strategies.
  
  •  

    SEC 210 Intrusion Detection

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the student to intrusion detection methods in use today. Topics include the types of intrusion detection products, traffic analysis, and planning and placement of intrusion detection solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to plan and implement intrusion detection solution for networks and host-based systems.
  
  •  

    SEC 285 Systems Security Project

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides the student the opportunity to apply the skills and competencies acquired in the program that focus on systems security. Emphasis is placed on security policy, process planning, procedure definition, business continuity, compliance, auditing, testing procedures and systems security architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to design and implement comprehensive information security architecture from the planning and design phase through implementation. Pre-requisite(s): CTI 110 , CTI 120 , and CTS 115 .

International Business

  
  •  

    INT 110 International Business

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the environment, concepts, and basic differences involved in international business. Topics include forms of foreign involvement, international trade theory, government influences on trade and strategies, international organizations, multinational corporations, personnel management, and international marketing. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the foundation of international business.

Legal Education

  
  •  

    LEX 110 Introduction to Paralegal Study

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the paralegal profession and the legal system, and an emphasis is placed on the role of professional and legal ethics. Topics include regulations, ethics, case analysis, legal reasoning, career opportunities, professional organizations, terminology and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain the role of the paralegal and identify the skills, knowledge, and ethics required of paralegals. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,  and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    LEX 120 Legal Research/Writing I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the techniques of legal research and writing. Emphasis is placed on locating, analyzing, applying, and updating sources of law; effective legal writing, including proper citation; and the use of electronic research methods. Upon completion, students should be able to perform legal research and writing assignments using techniques covered in the course. Co-requisite(s): LEX 110.  
  
  •  

    LEX 121 Legal Research/Writing II

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers advanced topics in legal research and writing. Topics include more complex legal issues and assignments involving preparation of legal memos, briefs, and other documents and the advanced use of electronic research methods. Upon completion, students should be able to perform legal research and writing assignments using techniques covered in the course. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 130 Civil Injuries

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers traditional tort concepts and the evolving body of individual rights created by statute. Topics include intentional and non-intentional torts with emphasis on negligence, strict liability, civil rights, workplace and environmental liability, remedies, and damages. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize, explain, and evaluate elements of civil injuries and related defenses. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 140 Civil Litigation I

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the structure of the legal system and the rules governing civil litigation. Topics include jurisdiction state and federal rules of civil procedure and evidence. Upon completion, students should be able to assist an attorney in pre-litigation matters and preparation of pleadings and motions. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 141 Civil Litigation II

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers advanced topics in the civil litigation process. Topics include motions, discovery, and trial and appellate procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to assist an attorney in preparing and organizing documents for trial, settlement and post-trial practice. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 140.  
  
  •  

    LEX 150 Commercial Law I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers legally enforceable agreements, forms of organization, and selected portions of the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include drafting and enforcement of contracts, leases, and related documents and selection and implementation of business organization forms, sales, and commercial papers. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the elements of a contract, prepare various business documents, and understand the role of commercial paper. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 151 Commercial Law II

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of LEX 150  and covers advanced topics in Business and Commercial Law. Topics include agency and employment, insurance, computer law, intellectual property, personal property and bailment, corporate organizations and bankruptcy. Upon completion, students will understand and be able to apply legal principles governing these topics and be able to draft a variety of financial instruments. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 150  
  
  •  

    LEX 160 Criminal Law and Procedure

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces substantive criminal law and procedural rights of the accused. Topics include elements of state/federal crimes, defenses, constitutional issues, pre-trial and trial process, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to explain elements of specific crimes and assist an attorney in preparing a criminal case. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 170 Administrative Law

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the scope, authority, and regulatory operations of various federal, state, and local administrative agencies. Topics include social security, worker’s compensation, unemployment, zoning, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to research sources of administrative law, investigate, and assist in representation of clients before administrative agencies. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 180 Case Analysis & Reasoning

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the techniques of reading and applying legal opinions and the skills of case analysis. Emphasis is placed on the components of opinions and on types of legal writing. Upon completion, students should be able to read, analyze, and brief opinions and prepare legal memoranda, briefs, and other legal documents. Co-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 210 Real Property I

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the study of real property law. Topics include the distinction between real and personal property, various estates, mechanics of conveyance and encumbrance, recordation, special proceedings, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to identify estates, forms of deeds, requirements for recording, and procedures to enforce rights to real property. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 211 Real Property II

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course continues the study of real property law relating to title examination and preparation of closing documents. Topics include use of courthouse and other public records in title examination and preparation of documents required in real estate transactions and closings. Upon completion, students should be able to plot/draft a description, perform complete title examination, draft closing documents including title insurance forms, and prepare disbursement reconciliation. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 210.  
  
  •  

    LEX 214 Investigation & Trial Prep

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the fundamentals of investigation. Topics include compiling/assembling data for cases; investigative planning/information gathering techniques; locating/interviewing witnesses; collection/preserving/evaluating sufficiency/admissibility of evidence; preparation of reports; and evidence presentation at depositions/court proceeding. Upon completion, students should be able to plan/use investigative checklists, understand/demonstrate investigative techniques, prepare reports, and enhance verbal and interpersonal communications skills and interviewing techniques. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 220 Corporate Law

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the legal aspects of forming, operating, and maintaining a business. Emphasis is placed on the business corporation with additional coverage of sole proprietorships and partnerships. Upon completion, students should be able to draft basic partnership and corporate documents and file these documents as required. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 240 Family Law

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers laws governing domestic relations. Topics include marriage, separation, divorce, child custody, support, property division, adoption, domestic violence, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to interview clients, gather information, and draft documents related to family law. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 250 Wills, Estates and Trusts

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers various types of wills, trusts, probate, estate administration, and intestacy. Topics include types of wills and execution requirements, caveats and dissents, intestate succession, inventories and accountings, distribution and settlement, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to draft simple wills, prepare estate forms, understand administration of estates including taxation, and explain terms regarding trusts. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 260 Bankruptcy and Collections

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of the laws of bankruptcy and the rights of creditors and debtors. Topics include bankruptcy procedures and estate management, attachment, claim and delivery, repossession, foreclosure, collection, garnishment, and post-judgment collection procedure. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and file bankruptcy forms, collection letters, statutory liens, and collection of judgments. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 270 Law Office Mgt/Technology

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides an overview of law office management and organization. Topics include office forms, filing systems, billing/time keeping, computer systems, calendar systems, library administration, case management, office/personnel procedures, ethics, and technology. Upon completion, students should be able to set up and maintain various law office systems, monitor case progress, and supervise non-lawyer personnel. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 271 Law Office Writing

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the basics of writing for the law office including the drafting of general correspondence, the briefing of cases, and the preparation of settlement brochures. Emphasis is placed on legal vocabulary in the context of letter writing, briefing judicial opinions, and the preparation of the settlement brochure. Upon completion, students should be able to draft letters to clients, opposing counsel, government entities, and insurance companies and prepare the settlement brochure. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 280 Ethics and Professionalism

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course reinforces legal ethics and the role of the paralegal in a professional work environment. Topics include a review of ethics, employment opportunities, and search techniques; paralegal certification and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to understand the paralegal’s role in the ethical practice of law. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 283 Investigation

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers various aspects of civil and criminal investigation. Topics include locating witnesses, interviewing techniques, obtaining records, sketching and photographing accident scenes, collecting and preserving evidence, and preparation of exhibits for trial. Upon completion, students should be able to locate witnesses, prepare questionnaires, interview witnesses, obtain criminal/motor vehicle/medical/accident records, sketch scenes, and prepare exhibits. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 285 Workers’ Comp Law

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the process of initiating and handling workers’ compensation claims. Emphasis is placed on reviewing and drafting relevant Industrial Commission forms. Upon completion, students should be able to interview clients, gather information, and draft documents related to workers’ compensation claims.
  
  •  

    LEX 286 Medical Evidence Analysis

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course is designed to teach reading and analyzing medical records for legal evaluation of bodily injury and disability claims. Emphasis is placed on terminology, identifying, obtaining and reviewing medical records and study of the major systems of the human body. Upon completion, students will be able to compile, analyze and organize medical documents to support or disprove injury claims. Pre-requisite(s): LEX 120.  
  
  •  

    LEX 288 Elder Law

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of laws especially relevant to older persons. Topics include healthcare decision-making, living wills, powers of attorney, financial and estate planning, government benefits, housing issues, elder abuse, and ethical considerations. Upon completion, students should be able to assist an attorney in addressing legal issues pertinent to the elderly.

Logistics

  
  •  

    LOG 110 Introduction to Logistics

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an overview of logistics. Topics include traffic management, warehousing, inventory control, material handling, global logistics, and the movement and storage of goods from raw materials sources to end consumers. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the different segments of logistics and use the terminology of the industry.
  
  •  

    LOG 125 Transportation Logistics

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers the role and importance of the transportation industry. This is an overview of transportation emphasizing its environmental and sociological aspects, economic impact, services, regulatory guidelines, policies, and its future. Upon completion, students should be able to identify modes of transportation, interpret governing regulations, and describe the principles and terminology used in the transportation industry.
  
  •  

    LOG 211 Distribution Management

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers the functions, techniques, and tools utilized in warehousing and distribution centers and their role in business and logistics. Emphasis is placed on warehouse and distribution center management, operations, productivity, software systems, picking, automation, cross docking, safety, security, material handling, benchmarking, and cost. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the role of warehouses and distribution centers, apply industry principles and terminology, and understand distribution productivity measures. Pre-requisite(s): LOG 110.  
  
  •  

    LOG 215 Supply Chain Management

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course covers all activities involved in the flow of products and information between the suppliers, customers, producers, and service providers. Topics include acquiring, purchasing, manufacturing, assembling, and distributing goods and services throughout the supply chain organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the supply chain units, describe the materials management processes, and prepare for the APICS CPIM examination. Pre-requisite(s): LOG 110.  
  
  •  

    LOG 235 Import/Export Management

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the elements of import and export operations, from transportation to documentation, finance, and security and the effects on the global supply chain. Emphasis is placed on existing import/export regulations, customs documentation, intermodal transportation, foreign freight forwarders, global technology, and homeland security initiatives. Upon completion, students should be able to perform import/export operations, channels of distribution, implemented technologies, and associate with operating a secure supply chain. Pre-requisite(s): LOG 125.  
  
  •  

    LOG 240 Purchasing Logistics

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces the various aspects of purchasing, and their impact on materials management, supply chain, transportation, and global logistics processes. Emphasis is placed on the different methods of electronic sourcing, negotiating and pricing principles, and on the internal and external considerations associated with international logistics. Upon completion, students should be able to describe and apply the principles and terminology used in procurement including electronic data interchange services, purchasing and logistics systems. Pre-requisite(s): LOG 110.  
  
  •  

    LOG 250 Advanced Global Logistics

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course covers the advanced application of global operations and logistics strategies, planning, technology, risk, and management necessary to cope with the global business environment. Emphasis is placed on an in-depth understanding of global sourcing, shipping, tracking, and e-logistics systems necessary to operate inbound/outbound logistics in a global market. Upon completion, students should be able to identify the different global markets and logistics technology available to process International inbound/outbound logistics transactions. Pre-requisite(s): LOG 125.  

Landscape Gardening

  
  •  

    LSG 122 Spring Gardening Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides familiarization with basic gardening techniques by performing practical hands-on exercises required for the spring season. Emphasis is placed on pruning, irrigation, planting, fertilizing, pest-control, equipment operation, turf maintenance, and landscape construction. Upon completion, students should be able to satisfactorily perform various practices essential to maintaining the landscape in the spring season.
  
  •  

    LSG 123 Summer Gardening Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides basic hands-on experience in summer gardening techniques. Emphasis is placed on pruning, irrigation, planting, fertilizing, pestcontrol, equipment operation, turf maintenance, landscape construction, and maintaining fruits and vegetables. Upon completion, students should be able to perform various techniques essential to maintaining the summer landscape.
  
  •  

    LSG 231 Landscape Supervision

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course provides experience in planning, implementing, and supervising various landscape management projects. Emphasis is placed on supervisory skills, organizing, and scheduling. Upon completion, students should be able to supervise employees in various landscape management jobs. Pre-requisite(s): LSG 123  and HOR 161.  

Machining

  
  •  

    MAC 111 Machining Technology I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 12 Clinic: 0 Credits: 6
    This course introduces machining operations as they relate to the metalworking industry. Topics include machine shop safety, measuring tools, lathes, drilling machines, saws, milling machines, bench grinders, and layout instruments. Upon completion, students should be able to safely perform the basic operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, turning, and milling. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,   and EFL 094 . Co-requisite(s): MAC 114  and BPR 111.  
  
  •  

    MAC 112 Machining Technology II

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 12 Clinic: 0 Credits: 6
    This course provides additional instruction and practice in the use of precision measuring tools, lathes, milling machines, and grinders. Emphasis is placed on setup and operation of machine tools including the selection and use of work holding devices, speeds, feeds, cutting tools, and coolants. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic procedures on precision grinders and advanced operations of measuring, layout, drilling, sawing, turning, and milling. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 111.  
  
  •  

    MAC 114 Introduction to Metrology

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the care and use of precision measuring instruments. Emphasis is placed on the inspection of machine parts and use of a wide variety of measuring instruments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the correct use of measuring instruments. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,   and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    MAC 115 Grinding Operations

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces surface and cylindrical grinding in the toolroom. Topics include safety and the basic setup and operation of surface and cylindrical grinding machines. Upon completion, students should be able to grind steps, slots, angles, radii, dress grinding wheels, and square blocks. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074 , EFL 084 , and EFL 094 .  MAC 114 , MAC 141 , and MAC 141A .
  
  •  

    MAC 121 Introduction to CNC

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the concepts and capabilities of computer numerical control machine tools. Topics include setup, operation, and basic applications. Upon completion, students should be able to explain operator safety, machine protection, data input, program preparation, and program storage. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,   and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    MAC 122 CNC Turning

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces the programming, setup, and operation of CNC turning centers. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC turning centers. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074 , EFL 084 , and EFL 094 , MAC 121 , MAC 141 , and MAC 141A .
  
  •  

    MAC 124 CNC Milling

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2


    This course introduces the manual programming, setup, and operation of CNC machining centers. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, part production, and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC machining centers. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074 , EFL 084 , and EFL 094 , MAC 121 MAC 141 , and MAC 141A .

     

  
  •  

    MAC 131 Blueprint Reading/Mach I

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers the basic principles of blueprint reading and sketching. Topics include multi-view drawings; interpretation of conventional lines; and dimensions, notes, and thread notations. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret basic drawings, visualize parts, and make pictorial sketches. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074 , EFL 084 , and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    MAC 132 Blueprint Reading/Mach II

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces more complex industrial blueprints. Emphasis is placed on auxiliary views, section views, violations of true project, special views, applications of GD & T, and interpretation of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret complex industrial blueprints. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074 , EFL 084 , and EFL 094 , and MAC 131 .
  
  •  

    MAC 141 Machining Applications I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course provides an introduction to a variety of material-working processes that are common to the machining industry. Topics include safety, process-specific machining equipment, measurement devices, set-up and layout instruments, and common shop practices. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate basic machining operations, accurately measure components, and effectively use layout instruments. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094. Co-requisite(s): MAC 114  and MAC 131 .
  
  •  

    MAC 141A Machining Applications I Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides an introduction to a variety of material-working processes, in a laboratory setting, that are common to the machining industry. Topics include safety, process-specific machining equipment, measurement devices, set-up and layout instruments, and common shop practices. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate basic machining operations, accurately measure components, and effectively use layout instruments. Pre-requisite(s): (DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, and DMA 050) and DRE 097 or (EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094)]. Co-requisite(s): MAC 114 , MAC 131 , and MAC 141 .
  
  •  

    MAC 142 Machining Applications II

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course provides instruction in the wide variety of processes associated with machining. Topics include safety, equipment set-up, holding fixtures, tooling, cutting speeds and depths, metal properties, and proper finishes. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate advanced machining operations, accurately measure components, and produce accurate components with a proper finish. Pre-requisite(s): (DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, and DMA 050) and DRE 097 or (EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094)], MAC 141 , and MAC 141A .
  
  •  

    MAC 142A Machining Applications II Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides laboratory instruction in the wide variety of processes associated with machining. Topics include safety, equipment setup, holding fixtures, tooling, cutting speeds and depths, metal properties, and proper finishes. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate advanced machining operations, accurately measure components, and produce accurate components with a proper finish. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 141 , and MAC 141A . Co-requisite(s): MAC 142 .
  
  •  

    MAC 143A Machining Applications III Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides laboratory instruction in the field of advanced machining. Emphasis is placed on creating complex components, close-tolerance machining, precise measurement, and proper equipment usage. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to produce an accurately machined component with a quality finish using the proper machining process. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 141 , MAC 141A , MAC 142 , and MAC 142A .
  
  •  

    MAC 151 Machining Calculations

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces basic calculations as they relate to machining occupations. Emphasis is placed on basic calculations and their applications in the machine shop. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic shop calculations. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,   and EFL 094 .
  
  •  

    MAC 178 CNC Turning: Operator

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 1
    This course introduces the operation of a qualified computer numerical controlled (CNC) program on a CNC controlled lathe. Topics include blueprints, tool offsets, speed and feed adjustment, G and M codes, program execution, cutting tools, holding devices and parts inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate the operation of a CNC lathe. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 141 , MAC 131 , MAC 114 , and MAC 121 . Co-requisite(s): MAC 122 .
  
  •  

    MAC 179 CNC Milling: Operator

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 1
    This course introduces the operation of a qualified computer numerical controlled (CNC) program on a CNC controlled milling machine. Topics include blueprints, tool offsets, speed and feed adjustment, G and M codes, program execution, cutting tools, holding devices and parts inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to safely demonstrate the safe operation of a CNC milling machine. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 114 , MAC 121 MAC 131 , and MAC 141 . Co-requisite(s): MAC 124 .
  
  •  

    MAC 180 CNC Turn: Prog Set & Op

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course introduces two-dimensional coordinate planes in a simple program used for the production of a part on a computer numerical controlled (CNC) lathe. Topics include blueprints, basic G and M codes, editor software, linear and circular interpolation, CNC lathes, process plan, Machinery Handbook, programming techniques and tool path. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proper industry techniques for developing a simple program for creating a part on a CNC lathe. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 114 , MAC 121 MAC 131 , and MAC 141 . Co-requisite(s): MAC 122 .
  
  •  

    MAC 181 CNC Mill: Prog Set & Oper

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 6 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course introduces the development of a simple program for the production of a part on a computer numerical controlled (CNC) milling machine. Topics include blueprints, basic G and M codes, editor software, linear and circular interpolation, CNC lathes, process plan, Machinery Handbook, programming techniques and tool path. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proper industry techniques for developing a simple program for creating a part on a CNC milling machine. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 114 , MAC 121 , MAC 131 , and MAC 141 . Co-requisite(s): MAC 124 .
  
  •  

    MAC 222 Advanced CNC Turning

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers advanced methods in setup and operation of CNC turning centers. Emphasis is placed on programming and production of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in programming, operations, and setup of CNC turning centers. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 122.  
  
  •  

    MAC 224 Advanced CNC Milling

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers advanced methods in setup and operation of CNC machining centers. Emphasis is placed on programming and production of complex parts. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in programming, operations, and setup of CNC machining centers. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 124.  
  
  •  

    MAC 229 CNC Programming

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 0 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course provides concentrated study in advanced programming techniques for working with modern CNC machine tools. Topics include custom macros and subroutines, canned cycles, and automatic machining cycles currently employed by the machine tool industry. Upon completion, students should be able to program advanced CNC functions while conserving machine memory. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 121,  MAC 122,  MAC 124,  or MAC 226.
  
  •  

    MAC 231 CAM: CNC Turning

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces Computer Numerical Control graphics programming and concepts for turning center applications. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of menus to develop a shape file in a graphics CAM system and to develop tool path geometry and part geometry. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a job plan using CAM software, including machine selection, tool selection, operational sequence, speed, feed, and cutting depth. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 121 , MEC 110 , MAC 141 , and MAC 141A .
  
  •  

    MAC 232 CAM: CNC Milling

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces Computer Numerical Control graphics programming and concepts for machining center applications. Emphasis is placed on developing a shape file in a graphics CAM system and transferring coded information from CAM graphics to the CNC milling center. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a complete job plan using CAM software to create a multi-axis CNC program. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010, DMA 020, DMA 030, DMA 040, and DMA 050) and DRE 097 or (EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094), MAC 121 , MAC 141  , MAC 141A , and MEC 110 .
  
  •  

    MAC 234 Adv. Multi-axis Machining

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course includes multi-axis machining using machining centers with multi-axis capabilities. Emphasis is placed on generation of machining center input with a CAM system and setup of pallet changer and rotary system for multi-axis machining fixtures. Upon completion, students should be able to convert CAD to output for multi-axis machining centers, including tooling, setup, and debugging processes. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 114 , MAC 132 , MAC 141 , and MAC 141A . Co-requisite(s): MAC 224  and MAC 234A .
  
  •  

    MAC 234A Adv. Multi-axis Machining Lab

    Lecture: 0 Lab: 3 Clinic: 0 Credits: 1
    This course covers the application of multi-axis machining using machining centers with multi-axis capabilities. Emphasis is placed on generation of machining center input with a CAM system and setup of pallet changer and rotary system for multi-axis machining fixtures. Upon completion, students should be able to convert CAD to output for multi-axis machining centers, including tooling, setup, and debugging processes. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 , DMA 030 , DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094, MAC 141 , MAC 141A , MAC 142 , and MAC 142A . Co-requisite(s): MAC 234 .
  
  •  

    MAC 248 Production Procedures

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course covers product planning and control and scheduling and routing of operations. Topics include cost-effective production methods, dimensional and statistical quality control, and the tooling and machines required for production. Upon completion, students should be able to plan, set up, and produce cost-effective quality machined parts. Pre-requisite(s): MAC 121.  

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MAT 110 Math Measurement & Literacy

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an activity-based approach that develops measurement skills and mathematical literacy using technology to solve problems for non-math intensive programs. Topics include unit conversions and estimation within a variety of measurement systems; ratio and proportion; basic geometric concepts; financial literacy; and statistics including measures of central tendency, dispersion, and charting of data. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the use of mathematics and technology to solve practical problems, and to analyze and communicate results. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074, EFL 084 and EFL 094 and satisfactory completion in one of the following courses: DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050 .
  
  •  

    MAT 121 Algebra/Trigonometry I

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an integrated approach to technology and the skills required to manipulate, display, and interpret mathematical functions and formulas used in problem solving. Topics include the properties of plane and solid geometry, area and volume, and basic proportion applications; simplification, evaluation, and solving of algebraic equations and inequalities and radical functions; complex numbers; right triangle trigonometry; and systems of equations. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074,  EFL 084,   and EFL 094  and satisfactory completion of DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  DMA 050,  and DMA 060 .
  
  •  

    MAT 122 Algebra/Trigonometry II

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course is designed to cover concepts in algebra, function analysis, and trigonometry. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, transformations of functions, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, vectors, and statistics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to use mathematics and technology for problem-solving, analyzing and communicating results. Pre-requisite(s): DRE 098  or EFL 074, EFL 084,  and EFL 094 and C or better in MAT 121.  
  
  •  

    MAT 143 Quantitative Literacy

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through project- and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize quantitative information as consumers and to make personal, professional, and civic decisions by decoding, interpreting, using, and communicating quantitative information found in modern media and encountered in everyday life. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory completion of DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  DMA 050  and DRE 098 .
  
  •  

    MAT 152 Statistical Methods I

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course provides a project-based approach to introductory statistics with an emphasis on using real-world data and statistical literacy. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Upon completion, students should be able to use appropriate technology to describe important characteristics of a data set, draw inferences about a population from sample data, and interpret and communicate results. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory completion of DRE 098  and DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  DMA 050 .
  
  •  

    MAT 171 Precalculus Algebra

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on solving equations and inequalities, solving systems of equations and inequalities, and analysis of functions (absolute value, radical, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic) in multiple representations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to algebra-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory completion of DRE 098  or EFL 074, EFL 084,  and EFL 094 and DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  DMA 050,  DMA 060,   DMA 070,  and DMA 080  or a grade of C or better in MAT 121.  
  
  •  

    MAT 172 Precalculus Trigonometry

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop an understanding of topics which are fundamental to the study of Calculus. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of trigonometric functions in multiple representations, right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, conic sections, and parametric equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to trigonometry-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory completion of DRE 098  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094 and a grade of C or better in MAT 171.  
  
  •  

    MAT 223 Applied Calculus

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to the calculus concepts of differentiation and integration by way of application and is designed for engineering technology students. Topics include limits, slope, derivatives, related rates, areas, integrals, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. Pre-requisite(s): Satisfactory completion of DRE 098  or EFL 074, EFL 084,  and EFL 094 and C or better in MAT 122.  
  
  •  

    MAT 263 Brief Calculus

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course is designed to introduce concepts of differentiation and integration and their applications to solving problems. Topics include graphing, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on applications drawn from business, economics, and biological and behavioral sciences. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the use of basic calculus and technology to solve problems and to analyze and communicate results. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in MAT 171.  
  
  •  

    MAT 271 Calculus I

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4


    This course is designed to develop the topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to derivative-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in MAT 172.  

    A student may place directly into MAT 271 if the student has met at least one (1) of the following criteria within the past five (5) years:

    • A score of 2 or higher on the AP Calculus AB Exam.
    • A grade of C or higher in an AP Calculus course and an unweighted HS GPA of 3.0 or higher.
    • A score of 90 or higher on the ACCUPLACER College-Level Math (CLM) test.
    • A score of 46 or higher on the trigonometry section of the ACT Compass Math Placement Test.
    • A score of 600 or higher on the SAT Math (580 prior to 3/1/2016) and a grade of C or higher in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Pre-Calculus course or an equivalent course from another state.
    • A score of 27 or higher on the ACT Math and a grade of C or higher in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Pre-Calculus course or an equivalent course from another state.
    • A score of 560 or higher on the SAT Subject Test in Mathematics Level 2.

  
  •  

    MAT 272 Calculus II

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop advanced topics of differential and integral calculus. Emphasis is placed on the applications of definite integrals, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and differential equations. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to integral-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics.  This is a Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) course. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in MAT 271.  
  
  •  

    MAT 273 Calculus III

    Lecture: 3 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course is designed to develop the topics of multivariate calculus. Emphasis is placed on multivariate functions, partial derivatives, multiple integration, solid analytical geometry, vector valued functions, and line and surface integrals. Upon completion, students should be able to select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding the solution to multivariate-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a general education course in Mathematics. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in MAT 272.  
  
  •  

    MAT 280 Linear Algebra

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to linear algebra topics. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for vectors, systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, multi-dimensional linear transformations, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, diagonalization and orthogonality. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to linear algebra-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. Pre-requisite(s): MAT 271 .
  
  •  

    MAT 285 Differential Equations

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to topics involving ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is placed on the development of abstract concepts and applications for first-order and linear higher-order differential equations, systems of differential equations, numerical methods, series solutions, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and LaPlace transforms. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the theoretical concepts and select and use appropriate models and techniques for finding solutions to differential equations-related problems with and without technology. This course has been approved for transfer under the CAA as a premajor and/or elective course requirement. Pre-requisite(s): C or better in MAT 272.  

Mechanical

  
  •  

    MEC 110 Introduction to CAD/CAM

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 2 Clinic: 0 Credits: 2
    This course introduces CAD/CAM. Emphasis is placed on transferring part geometry from CAD to CAM for the development of a CNC-ready program. Upon completion, students should be able to use CAD/CAM software to produce a CNC program. Pre-requisite(s): DFT 119  or MAC 121,  DMA 010,  DMA 020,  DMA 030,  DMA 040,  and DMA 050 , and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084,  and EFL 094.
  
  •  

    MEC 111 Machine Processes I

    Lecture: 1 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 3
    This course introduces shop safety, hand tools, machine processes, measuring instruments, and the operation of machine shop equipment. Topics include use and care of tools, safety, measuring tools, and the basic setup and operation of common machine tools. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts to specified tolerance. Pre-requisite(s): DMA 010 , DMA 020 DMA 030 DMA 040 , and DMA 050  and DRE 097  or EFL 074, EFL 084, and EFL 094.
  
  •  

    MEC 128 CNC Machining Processes

    Lecture: 2 Lab: 4 Clinic: 0 Credits: 4
    This course covers programming, setup, and operations of CNC turning, milling, and other CNC machines. Topics include programming formats, control functions, program editing, and part production and inspection. Upon completion, students should be able to manufacture simple parts using CNC machines.
 

Page: 1 <- 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12